January 2018

taking care of your toothbrush 62a212ddabf96

TAKING CARE OF YOUR TOOTHBRUSH

Did you know your toothbrush could be covered with almost ten million germs? We know … it’s gross! That’s why you should know how to store your toothbrush properly, and when it’s time to replace it.

If you need to brush up on your toothbrush care knowledge, we’ve got you covered so brushing will always leave you feeling squeaky clean.

Keeping a Clean Toothbrush

Your mouth is home to hundreds of types of microorganisms, so it’s normal for some of them to hang onto your toothbrush after you’ve used it. Rinsing your brush thoroughly with water after each use can get rid of leftover toothpaste and food particles that cling to the bristles. Some dentists suggest soaking your toothbrush in mouthwash every now and then can help reduce the amount of bacteria further.

Store your toothbrush in a cool, open environment away from the toilet or trash bin to avoid airborne germs. Closed containers should be avoided because they provide a warm, wet habitat that bacteria love to grow in.

If you have multiple people sharing one sink, an upright holder with different sections will keep everyone’s brushes separated and avoid cross contamination. In addition, we would hope this is a no-brainer, but please don’t share toothbrushes!

Microwaves and dishwashers are not suitable tools for cleaning a toothbrush, because brushes aren’t built to last through this kind of treatment. If you want a really clean toothbrush, your best option is simply to buy a new one.

Replacing Your Toothbrush

The American Dental Association recommends you replace your toothbrush every three to four months, or sooner depending on individual circumstances. Dr. Bentz and our team agree. If you have braces, tend to brush too strongly, or the bristles become frayed, it’s time for a new brush.

Children will also need replacement brushes more frequently than adults. If you or your child has been sick, you should replace the toothbrush immediately to avoid re-exposing yourself to illness.

Worn-out brushes are not only unsanitary, they don’t do a good job cleaning teeth. Bristles that are worn out and dull won’t scrape away plaque and bacteria as well as a fresh toothbrush can.

Though the idea of ten million germs can be worrisome, if you take a few small precautions, you may ensure your toothbrush stays in good shape. And the cleaner the toothbrush, the cleaner the smile!

common wisdom teeth problems 62a212e72ec14

COMMON WISDOM TEETH PROBLEMS

Have you ever wondered why people have wisdom teeth? These are a third set of molars that come in behind the rest of all your other teeth, usually during early adulthood. Scientists and anthropologists believe that wisdom teeth are a result of evolution, because our ancestors needed these extra teeth to handle their primitive diets. Nowadays, the average diet consists of fewer hard-to-chew foods, which renders wisdom teeth largely superfluous.

Most people begin to experience wisdom teeth pain between the ages of 17 and 25. Our ancestors nicknamed them wisdom teeth because they appeared at a time in life when we supposedly grew wiser.

If you’ve already had your wisdom teeth removed, you know how painful they can become if they aren’t taken care of promptly. If not, watch out for discomfort in the back of your mouth and let Dr. Bentz know right away if you think your wisdom teeth are coming in.

In some cases, people do not experience any problems or discomfort with their wisdom teeth. These patients may keep their wisdom teeth intact if there’s enough room in their jaw to fit them properly. But this is generally not the case, so wisdom teeth can cause several concerns, depending on which direction they grow.

Common problems include:

  • Damage to surrounding teeth due to the pressure from the emerging teeth
  • Infection that causes the surrounding gums to swell and become painful
  • Tooth decay due to the lack of room to clean the teeth properly
  • Impaction (when the tooth is unable to break through the skin)
  • A cyst that may damage the jaw, the surrounding teeth, and nerves

If you haven’t had your wisdom teeth removed yet, there are many symptoms to watch out for when they begin to grow. Symptoms may include:

  • Pain or stiffness in the jaw
  • Tooth irritation
  • Swelling of gum tissue
  • Crowding of other teeth
  • Spread of tooth decay or gum disease on nearby teeth

If you’ve noticed these symptoms, schedule an appointment at our East Norriton, PA office. Don’t forget: This is a common procedure that will take some time to recover from. Allow your mouth to heal, and then you’ll be able to get back to a normal routine quickly and be free from pain!

the difference between dentists and oral surgeons 62a212f352362

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DENTISTS AND ORAL SURGEONS

It’s useful to know what your dentist does in comparison to an oral surgeon. You may end up needing to see the latter at some point in your life, so Dr. Bentz and our team want you to understand the difference if you need to schedule an appointment with one of us.

Both dentists and oral surgeons are taught the skills to maintain a healthy mouth for their patients. They are both required to obtain a medical license after years of schooling, and some choose to go through additional to schooling to be able to treat specific areas of oral health.

Your general dentist is equipped to perform preventive care and treatment of teeth that show decay and damage. Cosmetic procedures such as teeth whitening and veneer placement are also common. However, in some circumstances, you may need an oral surgeon if the procedure you need to undergo exceeds your dentist’s abilities.

If you’ve been referred to Dr. Bentz, it may be because you need the following procedure done:

  • Dental implant surgery
  • Removal of a problem tooth
  • Oral cancer biopsies
  • Removal of tumors or cysts
  • Reconstructive surgery of the jaw or face to resolve various problems
  • Corrective surgery of the jaw to improve structure and alignment
  • Grafting of the bone or soft tissues in order to resolve defects and injuries
  • Repair of birth defects that have affected the face or jaw

Staying vigilant about your daily oral health routine and bi-yearly dental appointments may prevent problems that require these services. However, it may be impossible to avoid some of these procedures.

If you have noticed a serious issue involving your oral health, contact our East Norriton, PA office and schedule a consultation. Our team will create a plan to treat you quickly and effectively.

questions on dental implants weve got you covered 62a212ff45c87

Questions on Dental Implants? We’ve got you covered.

Whether you’ve lost a tooth from decay, are preparing for dentures, or were born with a gap where a tooth should have been, you could be a candidate for dental implants.

Dental implants have changed a lot since their debut in 1965, thanks to continuing advances in design and technology. Today, you no longer have to worry about whether dental implants might have a negative aesthetic impact on your smile.

So what are dental implants? Pretty much what they sound like: An implant is a replacement tooth that substitutes for a missing natural one. It gets placed through several steps; it’s a process that can take a few months.

The initial step involves the surgical implantation of the implant root, which resembles a small screw. After that’s placed, the top is covered with gum tissue to enable it to heal faster. This is an essential phase in the process, since this portion of the implant will serve as the base of support for everything else.

In the second step, the implant gets uncovered and an implant restoration (or crown) is created and affixed to it. After that, you’ve got yourself a new tooth!

While dental implants require a little special care, it’s all easily manageable. All you have to do at home is make sure you brush and floss your implant daily, the same as you would for any other tooth. Although an implant can’t develop a cavity, if something were to get stuck in it, that could lead to a gum infection.

If you have any other questions about dental implants, give our East Norriton, PA office a call!

what is a dry socket 62a213095d9ac

WHAT IS A DRY SOCKET?

A dry socket isn’t a common post-surgery complication, but it happens occasionally. A dry socket, technically known as alveolar osteitis, can occur after an adult tooth is extracted from the mouth. It occurs if the blood clot at the place the tooth was extracted gets lost.

Without a small, protective blood clot where the tooth was removed, nothing will stop the exposed bone and nerves from becoming infected. It’s easy to treat a dry socket, and care is recommended if noticeable pain develops in the area where the tooth came out.

You may have a dry socket if you experience severe pain, bad breath, or an unpleasant taste in the mouth. Dry sockets can happen right after a tooth is extracted, or may develop several days later due to bacterial contamination or trauma.

There is a higher risk of having a dry socket if you smoke, take oral contraceptives, perform poor oral hygiene, or have pre-existing infections in your mouth. Make sure you pay close attention to the state of your mouth after a tooth extraction if you have one or more of these higher risks for developing a dry socket.

If this condition does occur after surgery, Dr. Bentz can help by cleaning any debris that may have settled in the area. We can also provide a medicated gauze that should be changed regularly to help speed the healing process.

Antibiotics may be prescribed, depending on the infection, but Ibuprofen or acetaminophen can usually be sufficient to ease any pain.

If you think you might have a dry socket following oral surgery, please contact our East Norriton, PA office and let us know which symptoms you’re experiencing so we can assist you. To avoid getting a dry socket, make sure to get plenty of rest after surgery, drink lots of water, eat soft foods, and clean your mouth thoroughly.

We hope you never experience a dry socket, but if the situation does arise, you should be ready now!

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2601 Dekalb Pike
East Norriton, PA 19401

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Tuesday 7:30am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5:30pm
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610-272-6949

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